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Christopher Ward C40 SpeedHawk Automatic Chronograph

August 19, 2009


London based Swiss watchmaker, Christopher Ward, has just unveiled a new automatic chronograph model, the C40 SpeedHawk Chronograph. The case design was adapted from their best selling C4 Peregrine collection. Christopher Ward's website says "the C40's crowning glory, the customised ETA Valjoux 7750 movement can be seen in all its glory through the crystal exhibition back."


The 7750 movement is used by numerous Swiss watchmakers. It is not an exclusive movement. Still, it is very reliable and can be customized to each particular brands' specifications. For a fully assembled timepiece, with this movement, even in base form, generally you are going to pay over a grand. In some cases way over a grand. Not this one, it's under a grand.


Christopher Ward's newest wristwatch has a 42 mm x 16 mm stainless steel case. The case features a mixture of satin finishing and hand-polishing. A stainless steel uni-directional rotating bezel sits on top of the case and works with the internal tachymeter scale and chronograph, to measure average speed.


The dial is black with a sporty mixture of contrasting red and white elements. The dial consists of three central hands, for timekeeping. Including an all red seconds hand, with a Peregrine-shaped counterbalance. Three chronograph subdials, for hours, minutes and seconds are located at 12, 9 and 6. At 3 o'clock there is a day/date aperture that displays the day of the week and the date of the month. The timekeeping hands, top bezel marker and hour markers feature a luminous treatment, for low-light visibility.


Protecting the dial side of the watch is a curved (convex) sapphire crystal, with anti-reflective treatment. And protecting the back is a see-through sapphire crystal, allowing a view of the customized rotor and movement.


It will be available at the end of September, although you can pre-order it now. Retail is about $820 with a leather strap and $989 with an alligator strap.

$1,000 or less, Christopher Ward

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