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Hautlence

Jason Pitsch

Hautlence Vortex Bronze Hands-On

Jason Pitsch

Already available in titanium, blackened titanium, and red gold – the unusually shaped Hautlence Vortex, is now available in bronze. Bronze is a unique alloy that consists primarily of copper and is traditionally combined with metals such as tin, aluminum, and zinc. It is a very hard metal and can gain a unique patina over time as it oxidizes. In watches, this patina, arguably, is the desired effect. The introduction of the Vortex Bronze is in-line with some other timepieces that were introduced this year, such as the Black Bay Bronze from Tudor, or the Carl Brashear Limited Edition from Oris. The Vortex has an unmistakable case shape that is neither a cushion, rectangle, or square. Looking at the face of the watch, the sides are wider at the bottom and taper towards the top. A section of the strap

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Hautlence Conception d'Exception Vortex

First launched in 2010, Hautlence debuts another Concept d’Exception timepiece this month called: Vortex. The Vortex timepiece displays half-trailing hours, retrograde minutes and a power-reserve indicator. The display changes every hour, as the entire regulating organ rotates 60 degrees every 60 minutes. Inside is a redesigned and reinterpreted version of the innovative in-house automatic calibre HR2.0 presented in the first Concept d’Exception. Hautlence collaborated with the prominent Parisian design studio BBDC (Berra Blanquer Design Consultants) to create Vortex’s eye-catching and state-of-the-art design inspired by contemporary architecture. Vortex is available with three elegant straps that can interchanged with the included screwdriver. It is paired with a black Louisiana alligator leather strap with large square scales, a black hornback crocodile leather strap with red topstitching or a black rubber strap, each equipped with a folding clasp in grade 2 titanium with a

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The Hautlence HL2.0

After many years of development, Hautlence has finally unveiled their masterpiece, the HL2. Underneath the massive front and rear crystals, the complicated mobile bridge movement of the Hautlence HL2.0 is fully visible from all angles. As the name would suggest, instead of having a stationary bridge, the regulating organ (the balance wheel and escapement), rotate. The movement of the 12-link jump-hour chain causes the entire escapement assembly to rotate 60º four times each day. The hour takes 4-seconds to move into place and is shown in an aperture near 12 o'clock. The designers intentionally selected a slow-motion change of the hours because an instantaneous change could generate shocks that negatively affect the movement and timekeeping. The central dial is a retrograde minute display, with a speed regulator in the center the spins every 60-minutes when the minute disc jumps

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